I’ll get to it when I get to it

It has been many moons since I did a Top Ten Tuesday. The reason is – I’m lazy and I didnt want to use my brain juice to think of ten books pertaining to whatever category. I may not have enough power to make one leg step in front of the other to shuffle myself to bed. The struggle is real.

But I’m here now.

This week’s theme on The Broke and the Bookish is: “Top Ten staple books from <insert genre here> that I haven’t read”.

Like most sane people I adore YA. Despite the fact that it is advertised as Young Adult, the themes and content are so much more adult than many adult books. Stay tuned for a whole other post on that concept. The subject matter is heavy and fraught with emotion, and I don’t have to read about a middle aged woman who doesn’t do any work and talks about how busy she is for 300 pages… Sorry I’m still upset that I read Landline. Terrible book…So my theme of the reading I can’t believe I haven’t done, will be drawn from YA – and what I consider to be staples – old and young (in terms of publishing that is).

1. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

passive aggressiveI told myself I was going to read the book before I watched the movie, but then I saw this awesome gif of Patrick and I caved. He’s just the coolest ever. Anyway I’ve gone and ruined the twist of the book by watching the movie first. I’ll get to it. Eeeeeeventually!

2. Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

After the catastrophe that was ‘Landline’ I have been very hesitant to read any Rainbow Rowell. Landline was incredibly hyped up by the nonsense of Goodreads 2014 book of the year. Which was ALL LIES. Don’t let me down E&P, I couldn’t take the dissappointment

spoiler 3 & 4. Looking for Alaska & An abundance of Katherine’s by John Green

John Green can do no wrong. Well some wrongs (Margo is a terrible name), but ultimate everything is okay enough for him to be pushed into the right category. Besides the books look quite cute sitting next to each other on the bookshelf and if that isn’t a good enough reason, nothing is.

If I stay by Gayle Forman

I know I really don’t need more tears in my life, but this time I am determined to read the book and cry my eyes out, then watch the movie and cry whatever I have left.

  1. Stardust by Neil Gaiman

Just because Neil Gaiman.

  1. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

There is little more I love in this world than books about World War II. Except maybe when Peychaud makes dinner. Everything in my life is second to food. I have never read any Elizabeth Wein before, but I do love finding new authors to adore.

  1. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

To be honest – I saw this one on a Goodread list – and I keep seeing it on Goodreads list so I feel like I must be missing out on something. 2534 people can’t be wrong right? Wrong. That many people can be wrong. See ‘Landline’.

  1. The Maze Runner by James Dashner

I contemplated putting this one on the list because it is so clearly just the current trend, but it is also I trend I haven’t gotten around to yet, therefore it makes the list. I start playing fast and loose with my definitions when I’m getting through the staples.

  1. The Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

Ditto 9.

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10 thoughts on “I’ll get to it when I get to it

  1. Bec Graham

    I really, really want to read Code Name Verity. I think it would be amazing. E&P is impeccable! Really, really beautiful story. The Maze Runner trilogy is alright plotwise but the writing is subpar. Perks of Being a Wallflower is awesome but you have to like that genre to get into it. It’s very like the movie, but the voice can be difficult to get into. When you finally read If I Stay, lemme know what you think, because I’ve been tossing up whether to read that one too! YA is such a varied genre, it’s fantastic

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    1. Amy Wallin Post author

      I know what you mean about wallflower. I have this feeling that it’s going to be like wintergirls and I’ll really struggle with a main character who is an unreliable narrator. So many things to get to!

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      Reply
      1. Bec Graham

        How it talks about mental illness, specifically depression and suicidality. It’s something that gets glossed over or glorified in a lot of books. But Asher gets right into it. The way he talks about Hannah is just…amazing

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  2. Pingback: Simply the Best Top Ten Tuesdays | it's only three

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